Take a moment each day to listen to your body.  Pause, take a deep breath and really listen.  What is your body telling you?  Do you feel tight?  Do you feel the weight of stress on your shoulders?  Do you feel rigid or stuck?  Does it feel like you are almost holding your breath?

Emotions and behaviors go together.  Feel fear, take flight.  Feel angry, put up a fight.  This works great to regulate our emotions when our emotions are justified.  The cycle is complete and we come back to a balance. But, what do we do when we feel an emotion like fear, and there is no threat?

There is a skill you can use when you are feeling distressed, extreme anxiety, sorrow, or pain.  The next time you feel in a highly emotional state, use TIPPs as a way of managing stress, to change your physiology to feel more at ease.

A good way to bring balance and peace to your life is to do daily mindfulness exercises.  If you are not familiar with this, take a look at a three-step summary of the mindfulness exercises that can change your life.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a great way to help clients cope with different issues.  And, at its core is mindfulness, staying present.  This is where we can stay focused and control our thoughts and feelings.

Often, the children who suffer from ARFID experience a choking sensation from the smells or the feeling of certain foods in their mouths. Vomiting is also not unusual. The experience of these sensations leads to the child avoiding or restricting certain foods. Malnutrition then becomes an issue with this disorder.

Are there some annoying people in your life that just get under your skin?  You get stuck talking to them and leave feeling frustrated or even angry?  They are people you’d just rather not talk to, but can’t avoid.

We all experience trauma to some degree or another in our lives.  But, why do some people experience profound effects on their emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing?  This can lead to symptoms of anxiety, depression, anger, addiction and chronic pain.  To recover from trauma, we need to understand the triune brain.

Do you remember learning about the brain in science class years ago?  Maybe you observed your teacher dissect the parts of the brain.  The point of that lesson wasn’t to make you squeamish.  It was to help you understand how the brain works so you could understand yourself and how you experience the world.

Are your emotions controlling you?  Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) is a highly effective research-based treatment designed by Dr. Marsha Linehan to help those struggling with eating disorders, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, and trauma to cope with life’s stresses. 

Do you think about gratitude? Gratitude is a powerful emotion for the appreciation of what one has. For some, it may be a healthy baby, a warm, cozy bed, or a good job. We can make lists of the things we are grateful for in our lives. But, why is gratitude so important?

Spring is almost here.  Very soon, the gardens will wake up and those buds that have been waiting all winter long will feel the energy from the sun and begin to bloom.  We will see and smell beautiful flowers everywhere.  It’s such a happy and joyful time.

Many people ask themselves, “Why me? Why did this happen? Why am I like this?”  But, when we answer these questions, we tap into our shame and guilt.  This leads to negative thinking that we are a terrible person.

How’s it going to turn out?  So many of us catastrophize our futures.  We think it’s going to turn out terrible and let our minds go to the negative but, that’s our imagination talking.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy, also known as DBT, helps clients gain skills they can use in stressful moments.  Often times we go let our minds play the “what if” game and it takes us to a negative place.  “What if I don’t get the job?”  And the stressful moment becomes worse just imagining the bad that would come of that.

When you think of Somatic Experiencing Therapy, do you think of some kind of voodoo therapy?  Think you will be touched the whole time?  Well, those are some of the myths about Somatic Experiencing.

I’m going to help you rebalance your day, or give you a tool to rebalance your day, for eating and your blood sugar level. It’s called “Four Questions.”

Bulimia is a medical condition signified by an insatiable desire to keep eating and eating until you gorge yourself, all in a short span of time.

As with any type of disorder or disease, in order to recover from an eating disorder, you first have to admit there is a problem. That can be really, really tough. But you can do it.

Sheri Robenstine of Healthy Futures has a few tips on how to improve your body image and have more fun this summer. First, concentrate on positive thoughts about your body.