The world is judgmental. It would be great if people didn’t judge others on seemingly every little thing. It would even be better if everyone liked everyone else, but sadly this in not the case.

Curiosity is truly a great thing. It is the perfect antidote to boredom. Look around you and there are things you can be curious about. If you see something that you want to know more about – great! Grab your computer or phone and research it.

Life has its fair share of ups and downs. If you are struggling with depression, please hear this – it’s going to be OK! You matter and are worthy. It is OK to reach out and ask for help because no one – not one single person – has it all figured out. Everyone struggles from time to time.

We are taught as a child that life is not always fair, that things will not always go our way. However, as we grow into adulthood, it is easy to turn unfair situations into a time of self-pity, or even depression. Thankfully, there is an easy concept to avoid going down this path. Self-Compassion.

Are you part of the transgender community or do you identify yourself as being transgender? Do you have a healthy relationship with food? With your body?

The best practice for healthy eating is being consistent with your eating every day.  But, before you can practice healthy eating, you need to know what that looks like for you.  It may be different from one person to the next.  So, ask yourself some questions.

We know that loneliness depletes the immune system and is not beneficial to our long-term mental health. The simple way to combat loneliness is with kindness that connects us to our self and to others in a beneficial way.

Unfortunately, bullying in schools is common.  It typically occurs in places out of view of an adult, such as on the playground, on the school bus, in the cafeteria, hallways or locker rooms.  And, in this modern society, it also happens via technology on social media.

We all experience trauma to some degree or another in our lives.  But, why do some people experience profound effects on their emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing?  This can lead to symptoms of anxiety, depression, anger, addiction and chronic pain.  To recover from trauma, we need to understand the triune brain.

Do you remember learning about the brain in science class years ago?  Maybe you observed your teacher dissect the parts of the brain.  The point of that lesson wasn’t to make you squeamish.  It was to help you understand how the brain works so you could understand yourself and how you experience the world.

Spring is almost here.  Very soon, the gardens will wake up and those buds that have been waiting all winter long will feel the energy from the sun and begin to bloom.  We will see and smell beautiful flowers everywhere.  It’s such a happy and joyful time.

Would you know what to do when you recognize depression or anxiety with some eating disorder behavior in a loved one?  In the following video, Dr. Kim DiRé of Healthy Futures in Scottsdale, Arizona offers tips to help you get your loved one the help he or she needs.

Bulimia is a medical condition signified by an insatiable desire to keep eating and eating until you gorge yourself, all in a short span of time.

Some eating disorders are easier to hide from family and friends, but there are tell-tale signs to look for that can help identify signs of eating disorders. 

Really listening to someone means staying present with them in conversation.  But, it’s human nature to stray from conversation.  We all do it.

Having a lucky day is not just about having good luck.  There’s no trick to it, lucky people just have certain things in common.  They have a positive perspective and attitude toward life.

Anorexia is one of the most well-known eating disorders. Many celebrities have struggled with it over the years including Karen Carpenter, Diana Ross, Sally Field, Jane Fonda, and even the Crown Princess of Sweden.

Ilene Smith, an expert with the Eating Disorder Resource Center and consultant to Healthy Futures, gets right to the point at why “Yo-Yo Dieting” doesn’t succeed over the long term. You might lose the weight for a few years but it always comes back.

Nearly 20 million women and 10 million men in the U.S. will suffer from an eating disorder in their lifetime. Eating disorders are serious emotional and physical problems that can have life threatening consequences.