Curiosity is great to use for mental health. First of all, everybody can access it and doesn’t take any extra effort or any extra power.

Relaxing does not always come easy to everyone. Dr. Kim DiRé shares a technique called progressive relaxation that she uses to help create a state of relaxation and equilibrium for your nervous system.

Did you know your brain never stops thinking? It is true, however most people do not pay attention to their thoughts on a regular basis. With mindfulness, though, we learn to pay attention to our thoughts and our emotions as well as the way we interpret things.

What is your first memory have shame? Perhaps it is from childhood after being placed in your first time-out. Or maybe you remember it more clearly in your teenage years. Whatever it may be, shame is a feeling we all struggle with and it is essential that we learn about overcoming shame and the steps to take to recover from it.

For individuals and families struggling with eating disorders, the holidays can be a particularly difficult time of year. There are expectations, family members who say the wrong things, and celebrations that focus on a meal. 

If you struggle with unhealthy behaviors, try a different technique. Imagine you have an itch. Feeling that itch now? Now, don’t scratch it! Instead, pause and think about it. Observe and describe the itch.

Take a moment each day to listen to your body.  Pause, take a deep breath and really listen.  What is your body telling you?  Do you feel tight?  Do you feel the weight of stress on your shoulders?  Do you feel rigid or stuck?  Does it feel like you are almost holding your breath?

Emotions and behaviors go together.  Feel fear, take flight.  Feel angry, put up a fight.  This works great to regulate our emotions when our emotions are justified.  The cycle is complete and we come back to a balance. But, what do we do when we feel an emotion like fear, and there is no threat?

There is a skill you can use when you are feeling distressed, extreme anxiety, sorrow, or pain.  The next time you feel in a highly emotional state, use TIPPs as a way of managing stress, to change your physiology to feel more at ease.

A good way to bring balance and peace to your life is to do daily mindfulness exercises.  If you are not familiar with this, take a look at a three-step summary of the mindfulness exercises that can change your life.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a great way to help clients cope with different issues.  And, at its core is mindfulness, staying present.  This is where we can stay focused and control our thoughts and feelings.

Are there some annoying people in your life that just get under your skin?  You get stuck talking to them and leave feeling frustrated or even angry?  They are people you’d just rather not talk to, but can’t avoid.

Are your emotions controlling you?  Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) is a highly effective research-based treatment designed by Dr. Marsha Linehan to help those struggling with eating disorders, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, and trauma to cope with life’s stresses. 

Do you think about gratitude? Gratitude is a powerful emotion for the appreciation of what one has. For some, it may be a healthy baby, a warm, cozy bed, or a good job. We can make lists of the things we are grateful for in our lives. But, why is gratitude so important?

Many people ask themselves, “Why me? Why did this happen? Why am I like this?”  But, when we answer these questions, we tap into our shame and guilt.  This leads to negative thinking that we are a terrible person.

How’s it going to turn out?  So many of us catastrophize our futures.  We think it’s going to turn out terrible and let our minds go to the negative but, that’s our imagination talking.

Traumatic experiences are not just for war heroes.  Trauma can be experienced in many ways.  It can come from specific events or a series of events.  And, it can present from pre-verbal times or events from which we have no memory.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy, also known as DBT, helps clients gain skills they can use in stressful moments.  Often times we go let our minds play the “what if” game and it takes us to a negative place.  “What if I don’t get the job?”  And the stressful moment becomes worse just imagining the bad that would come of that.

When you think of Somatic Experiencing Therapy, do you think of some kind of voodoo therapy?  Think you will be touched the whole time?  Well, those are some of the myths about Somatic Experiencing.